Do Something Series Arc

Josh Griffin —  November 17, 2011 — 4 Comments

This past weekend we started a series called Do Something – we did something similar a couple of years ago with great success and thought it was time to bring it back again. Here’s the 2-week series arc where we’re hoping to take students:

WEEK 1: Christmas Shoe Boxes
This weekend we teach about the needs right here in Orange County. Santa Ana is one of the poorest cities in America, and they are our neighbor. We’ll pack shoe boxes for our Food Bank to give away during the holidays as people come in to get free groceries. At the end of each service we planned to take a group photo that would end up on Facebook and get tagged by everyone as well.

WEEK 2: Fallen Soldiers, Persecuted Church, HIV/AIDS
The second week of the series the plan is to have students write letters to the children of soldiers who have been killed in the war. We are bringing in a chaplain to speak to the students as well. After that we’ll highlight the persecuted church and have a guest speaker share about HIV/AIDS and what students can do to help in our community.

JG

In the process of finishing two books on the topic of Jesus. Here are a few thoughts:

The first, Jesus Manifesto:Restoring the Supremacy and Sovereignty of Jesus Christ by Leonard Sweet and Frank Viola, is a challenging read simply exalting Jesus above everything else. They contend that a complete emphasis on Jesus would completely change the world – if we can introduce people to the real, life-changing Jesus, everything else will follow. Lifestyle will follow. Church growth will happen. Discipleship will happen. Simply teach Jesus. Not sure how much of it I’m ready to go after, but preaching and teaching Jesus has to be what the church is all about. Definitely lives up to its subtitle elevating Jesus to the highest place. Pretty academic read, you’ll want to break it into chunks and not speed read for sure.

The second book I’m tackling is Humanitarian Jesus: Social Justice and the Cross by Ryan Dobson and Christian Buckley, and it is a much more accessible read. It attempts to tackle the social Gospel and evangelism question, giving a brief history of the concept and conflict of the ideas of sharing Jesus. The first half of the book is written by the authors, the second is interviews with people in key churches and organizations that are attempting to be the hands and feet of Jesus. Good stuff, drives me to my current thinking – the Social Gospel must be both social (helping people) and Gospel (spreading the Good News of Jesus Christ)! There are many books on this subject, this one probably isn’t the most academic or comprehensive, but by far the most current.

JG