There is no shortage of content on the internet.

Case in point, check out this unique video that is a thematic mash-up of the old video game Street Fighter and the randomness of church ministry:

(thanks to David John Perez for the find)

If you’re like me, you’ll be laughing in an instant. I had a few moments where I couldn’t stop laughing, in fact.

Thankfully, the video is over seven minutes long. This gave me a little more time to think about what I was watching.

I’m all for laughing at myself as a Christian. There are plenty of resources that provoke this, such as media that mocks how church can seem like a Starbucks to great blogs like the one Jon Acuff writes. I’m sure I’m not the only one who’s walked away from such creative content and thought, “I’m so glad to know I’m not the only one who thinks it’s odd that we slap stick-figure fish on our vehicles, and then war it out with evolutionists by making our fish eat their mockery of our fish.”

So back to the video – as I was having fun enjoying the archaic video game sound effects over mass healing services, I was reminded…

those are healing services.

People with real afflictions came in to seek something from God.

They’re desperate. They’ve been given little hope everywhere else.

Granted, in my right mind I wouldn’t go to such stage presentations that seem more theatrical than spiritual. Then again, am I right in my mind about that? If my kid was sick and I heard a guy was coming to town who has a reputation for healing, would I endure the hot stage lights and his hair-sprayed helmet head so my son or daughter could know the touch of God?

“Hadouken!”

(that’s “Street Fighter” for “Amen!”)

What do you think – as we circulate these with our Christian friends or share them with youth group kids…

are we doing more good than harm… or more harm that good?

I’m sure there will be some quick replies on this, and we may even toss out classic ideas like “Balance… everything in moderation.”

So before you answer, consider:

But even the archangel Michael, when he was disputing with the devil about the body of Moses, did not himself dare to condemn him for slander but said, “The Lord rebuke you!” (Jude 1:9)

But among you there must not be… obscenity, foolish talk or coarse joking, which are out of place, but rather thanksgiving. (Ephesians 5:3-4)

Why Be a Team Player

Josh Griffin —  October 29, 2012 — Leave a comment

Matt McGill (who has been on a blogging streak lately) posted some great reasons why your youth ministry should be aligned with the whole church and not just a siloed ministry. Here’s 1, 3 and 4 – head there for the rest and be sure to subscribe to his blog, too:

1. The youth ministry is not the church–it may be the best part of the church, but it’s still just a part.

3. Greater alignment usually means greater impact. Being a team player increases your alignment with the bigger picture.

4. Lead by example. You know how friendship works: if you want a friend, be a friend first. There will be days when you need help from the rest of the church. Be the first one to serve so that they are more eager to serve you. Obviously, this can be twisted into a game of politics, but you don’t have to go that far with it.

JG



Connecting with Students

Josh Griffin —  October 23, 2012 — 1 Comment

AC had a solid blog post a couple days ago about connecting with students. He is a master relational youth worker in our ministry – definitely some good stuff we all can learn from him. Here’s a clip of the who article, head there for the rest:

  1. Lead by example and with words. – Preach and promote from first hand experience.  Would you buy a Ford from a salesman who drove a Chevy?
  2. Never miss an opportunity to point the student to Christ. – We believe Christ is the answer, the cure, the end all be all. In my experience a lot of the students problems are centered around where Christ is in their life.  You still have to be mindful of your approach but all roads should lead back to Christ.
  3. Never miss an opportunity to listen. – I cannot stress enough how important it is you become a listener.  I know some people are good at it naturally and some of us have to work at it.  It is truly a quiet mega strength that connects you with any student.

JG