SYMC is this weekend, so I thought it would be good to bring this post back so that all of us attending the conference this weekend are on the same page. As youth workers from all over the world converge on Indianapolis in just a few days each of them has an important decision to make: How do I wear or not wear my conference lanyard. There are four distinct phases to the evolution of lanyard style and they are as follows.

1 – The “Standard”: The most common form of lanyard style, with it worn as intended around the neck with your name in a place where people can read your name and greet you with it. Often covered in buttons and other flair, the standard position is helpful to everyone else at the conference.

2 – The “Awkward / Cool”: Bored with the standard position many people choose to place their lanyard near or below waist level which causes awkward gazes to the nether regions when greeting new people. This style makes it easy for you to know who has truly forgotten your name as they will be unable to look natural reading this strategically placed lanyard tag.  You might be tricked into thinking this is “cool” but its more uncomfortable than anything.

3 – The “I think People Know Me”: If you have been to the conference enough, you are tempted to think that people will recognize you and thus a lanyard might not be necessary, after all do they know who you are? right? Stage three is marked with an intentional concealing of the name card, but with lanyard strap in view so that if necessary you can reveal your credentials at the door if someone has possibly not been graced by your presence in the past.

4 – The “People Definitely Know Me”: Stage 4 is all in, no lanyard in sight or on your person. People know you, and when you walk through the door, no one asks questions. This is the riskiest of all the phases because if it backfires, its a long way back to your hotel room to get it.

I can’t wait to see you all in Indianapolis, I am a phase 1 guy, with my Canadian connect group pin for added flair. See you this weekend.

-Geoff @geoffcstewart

 

SYMC is not too far off in the distance, and after a great few days at Group World HQ working out many of the details, I am positive this will be the best SYMC to date. With that said, youth workers from all over the world will converge on Indianapolis March 1-4th and each of them has an important decision to make: How do I wear or not wear my conference lanyard. There are four distinct phases to the evolution of lanyard style and they are as follows.

1 – The “Standard”: The most common form of lanyard style, with it worn as intended around the neck with your name in a place where people can read your name and greet you with it. Often covered in buttons and other flair, the standard position is helpful to everyone else at the conference.

2 – The “Awkward / Cool”: Bored with the standard position many people choose to place their lanyard near or below waist level which causes awkward gazes to the nether regions when greeting new people. This style makes it easy for you to know who has truly forgotten your name as they will be unable to look natural reading this strategically placed lanyard tag.  You might be tricked into thinking this is “cool” but its more uncomfortable than anything.

3 – The “I think People Know Me”: If you have been to the conference enough, you are tempted to think that people will recognize you and thus a lanyard might not be necessary, after all do they know who you are? right? Stage three is marked with an intentional concealing of the name card, but with lanyard strap in view so that if necessary you can reveal your credentials at the door if someone has possibly not been graced by your presence in the past.

4 – The “People Definitely Know Me”: Stage 4 is all in, no lanyard in sight or on your person. People know you, and when you walk through the door, no one asks questions. This is the riskiest of all the phases because if it backfires, its a long way back to your hotel room to get it.

I can’t wait to see you all in Indianapolis, I am a phase 1 guy, with my Canadian connect group pin for added flair. SYMC Stronger 2013 BE THERE!

-Geoff (Twitter)